Leadership Trainings Empower Parents to Enhance Their Lives, Families and Communities

Throughout parenthood, mothers and fathers often find themselves wishing for instructions on how to raise their children to be successful in school and in life. Though no such manual exists, some neighborhood organizations supported by United Way of Metro Chicago are providing parents with the next best tool – parent leadership programs.

“Parent leadership programs are a great way for parents to get to know each other and to get more involved in their community. It gives parents a voice and the confidence to speak up for their children and advocate for them within the school system and their communities,” said Jessica Lucas, a senior program manager with United Way of Metro Chicago. “It also affords parents the opportunity to build relationships and friendships throughout the community, which leads to more engaged, vibrant and safer communities.” 

We, at United Way, support parent leadership programs through our Neighborhood Network Initiative, a region-wide strategy to address community challenges by driving focused collaboration between coalitions of residents, schools, nonprofits, government officials, businesses and other stakeholders. 

In our West Chicago Neighborhood Network, WeGo Together for Kids teaches parents how to set and pursue personal and collective goals that can better themselves and their community.

Forty miles east, in our Brighton Park Neighborhood Network, the Brighton Park Neighborhood Council is training parents to work alongside teachers in local classrooms and play a more active role in their children’s education.

Though the two Neighborhood Networks take different approaches to parent leadership training, their outcomes are very much the same — parents are being empowered to enhance their lives, families and communities in bold, new ways.



West Chicago: Setting Personal, Collective Goals for Success


At District 33 schools in the suburbs of West Chicago, WeGo Together for Kids hosts a yearly leadership program that teaches parents how to set and achieve short- and long-term goals. The goals vary, but all are intended to improve not only the parents’ lives, but the lives of others engaged with the school.

“Our mission is really to work with the parents to build advocacy skills, to work on leadership opportunities and then find different committees or building bases in the schools or communities where the parents feel empowered and welcome to share their voice at the table,” said Ciara Thomas, community school coordinator for the district.

Some of the 15 parents who enroll in the program each year aim to learn English and develop the skills needed to help their children with their schoolwork, while others plan to obtain United States citizenship, return to school or adapt healthier lifestyles.

To achieve their goals, parents must put themselves first for a change. “[The program] kind of asks the parents to be selfish and really focus on themselves so they are fully in-tune with themselves and they can be leaders for their families and communities,” Ciara explained.

Ma. Elena Gonzalez

Once their goals are set, We Go Together for Kids’ leadership program provides a supportive environment for the parents as they pursue their next steps. 

For Ma. Elena Gonzalez, a mother of two, the program helped her build the confidence to pursue her goals and opened her mind to new ways of thinking. “What has impacted me the most is to know myself more – to know what I can do and what I can become,” Ma. Elena said. 

In her two years with the program, she’s accomplished one of her biggest goals – becoming a U.S. citizen. “I feel fulfilled as a person. I feel enthusiasm for myself that I managed to make this goal and that I can achieve more and go further,” Ma. Elena said.

Likewise, Maria Dolores, a mother of three who’s lived in West Chicago for 11 years, has learned the skills needed to pursue her own ambitions, like prioritizing her personal growth and improving her English speaking. Doing so required her to shift her habits. “I’m drawn to the idea that one always gives to the family and children first and then to oneself, and this program taught me to put myself first,” Maria said.

She also learned to divide her long-term goals into smaller goals that are less intimidating and more achievable in her day-to-day life and to rely more on her family for support. “I have taken several steps, some of them have worked and some of them have not. I have done a lot to create my time and my space,” Maria said. “For my English, I have been practicing more with my little boy and I have been practicing my pronunciation, which is hard…but I’m moving forward.”

Maria Dolores & family

The strong focus on personal goal-setting is the first six-week phase of the Community Organizing and Family Issues, or COFI, learning model used for the leadership program. In the second phase, the parents identify a community-wide goal and work together to achieve it. This helps develop the parents’ advocacy and leadership skills.

Last year, the parent cohort aimed to improve their children’s physical activity, so they created a weekly walking club for families and students to meet and be active together. The next cohort explored the health benefits of reducing children’s consumption of sugary drinks.

At the end of the school year, the parents, wanting to share their newfound knowledge with others, gathered 200 preschool moms on Mexican Mother’s Day in May to present their findings. “It was really cool to see them as leaders and have them present the material to other families, as opposed to school staff or an institution,” Ciara said. “[These lessons] are more impactful coming from a peer.”

Since graduating from the program, several parents have also gone on to sit on the school’s Resident Leadership team, helping with asset mapping and surveying other parents to learn how the school can better support their families’ needs.

For Ciara, who works closely with each cohort, witnessing the parents put their teachings into action has been a rewarding endeavor. “It’s exciting to see their growth and to see how parents really have the opportunity to decide where they want to go from here.”  

 

Brighton Park: Leading in the Classroom and Beyond

Luisa Valadez

Prior to last school year, Luisa Valadez, a seven-year resident of Brighton Park, spent her days as a housewife, caring for her three children and home. Some days when her older children returned from school and asked her how her day was, she became frustrated that she had little to share.

“Sometimes, I felt like I can do nothing. [What am I] here for? What can I do?” said Luisa, reflecting on the past. “And in the night, when the day is done, I didn’t do anything.”

After talking to a friend, Luisa was invited to join a parent-mentorship program that trained parents to work as a teachers’ aides in schools across the neighborhood. Though at first hesitant, Luisa opted to give it a try.

Facilitated by the Brighton Park Neighborhood Council (BPNC), the parent-mentorship program helps local parents prioritize their personal success, develop workplace skills and prepare them to volunteer in the classroom.

“The program helps you to be a little bit professional, with professional discipline. At the same time, you are learning and giving those tools to other parents, working in the school and helping the students,” said Beatriz Merlos, the parent organizer for BPNC.

Once the parents complete the training, they are placed in a classroom for two hours every day, Monday through Thursday. They’re tasked with setting up activities for the students, leading small groups and working one-on-one with students who need additional guidance.

Olga Diane Morales, a grandmother from the neighborhood, has worked at Burroughs Elementary School for three years. She relishes the bonds she’s developed with students, some of whom remember her from her first days in the school.  

“My favorite part of being a parent mentor is interacting with the kids, working with them. I’ve learned to have more patience…and I’ve learned to be trusted by the kids,” Olga said. “It feels so good because now I walk around the school and they’re like ‘Oh, Ms. Morales! How are you?”

Unsurprisingly, the program benefits more than the parents. The mentors’ presence creates a better environment for the teachers and students to learn and engage.

“There’s a lot of variables that contribute to student success — or lack of, in some cases — but having parents and teachers in there is huge,” Burroughs Elementary School Principal Richard Morris said.

“Parents and teachers working together is probably the best formula for student success,” he added. “Parents are lesson-planning with teachers, working with small groups of kids, working directly for the academic success of the kids in the classroom.”

Students who are dealing with issues outside the classroom especially benefit from the individualized attention the parent volunteers can provide. In their training and weekly Friday workshops, parents are taught to navigate students’ range of behaviors and personal traumas. “The kids feel less stressed because they’re [able to be] open with that parent with the situations they’re dealing with at school or at home,” Beatriz said.

Like West Chicago’s leadership program, Brighton Park’s program also encourages the parents to prioritize their personal success. It teaches them to plan and execute personal goals, such as adopting a healthier lifestyle, learning English or continuing their education.

Beatriz Merlos

Beatriz, who has coordinated the program since its launch in 2012, personally understands how the program can improve the lives of individuals and families by supporting the parents’ interests and success. 

“If you could hear me eight years ago, I wasn’t able to speak in English like I am in this moment. I never went to school to learn my English,” Beatriz said. “I learned my English because I put in a lot of effort to learn it. That’s why I’m very consistent to promote these programs because I’m an example of it [working].”

A stay-at-home mother for 17 years, Beatriz was required to look for a job and resources to support her family after a tragedy struck. BPNC’s leadership team began helping Beatriz, a volunteer with the organization, learn how to use computers and speak English. Eventually, they asked her to run the parent-mentorship program.

“I wanted to do something for my people,” Beatriz said. “Not to just be an example, but to be a guide to those parents who are like me and looking for opportunities to learn and make a difference.”

The program Beatriz and BPNC created, with support from United Way, has helped numerous parents, like Luisa and Olga, find opportunities to put their newfound skills and motivation to the test.

A year since her training, Luisa has seen great improvement in herself.  The parent leadership program not only raised her self-confidence, it’s motivated her to return to school to earn her GED.

“Mothers like me, we always think that we were made to be home, to clean the house, to make dinner, and do laundry. We don’t know all the things we can do,” Luisa said. “When this program came to my life, everything changed.”

Students’ Paths to Success Aided by Dedicated Mentors

The academic and career trajectory of young adults growing up in the Chicago region often hinges on the support systems they can rely on. Some are born into strong, supportive networks of family and friends, while others must cultivate their own, creating bonds that enhance their life journey.

So was the case for Jessica, a student from North Lawndale.

High school was a troubling time for Jessica, as she often had conflict with her peers and struggled academically. Those challenges left her feeling like she wasn’t cut out for high school and that graduation, inevitably, wasn’t in the cards. That’s until she was connected to the Stay In School Initiative through the youth agency Young Men’s Education Network (YMEN).

The Stay In School Initiative – a partnership between United Way of Metro Chicago, Exelon and ComEd – works with six community agencies and their partner high schools to offer a holistic range of programs and services to students and their families. The programs include tutoring, social service referrals, leadership and social engagement training, and parent involvement classes. The heart of the program is a mentoring component, in which hundreds of Exelon and ComEd employees partner with students to offer academic support and guidance, as well as to host monthly workshop series for skill-building.

Having the opportunity to meet professionals who can provide career and social guidance is invaluable for the students. The mentor-mentee relationship can inspire youth to consider their career paths at an early age and provide them with the skill set and goals needed to achieve their dreams.

For September McDonald, an SIS student and United Way of Metro Chicago summer intern, the program also enabled to her learn more about herself and her place in the world. 

“[The Stay In School program] opened my eyes to another world,” September said. “It’s making me an even more well-rounded person…someone who is also culturally, socially and politically aware of what’s going on in my surroundings.”

Closing an education gap 

When the SIS program began seven years ago, United Way, with the help of our corporate partners, aimed to address a gap in youth education and resolve chronic truancy and high dropout rates. Since, the program has had a positive impact on thousands of students, including more than 1,800 youth who participated during the 2017-18 school year.

Of the 536 students who most actively participated in SIS this past year , nearly 85 percent achieved satisfactory school attendance, and more than 88 percent of students achieved satisfactory grade performance. In addition, all of the 2018 Stay In School seniors graduated from high school.

Jessica was among them. Her participation in SIS allowed her to write a different life story than the one that was unfolding. Her SIS mentors and the staff of YMEN helped Jessica make a much-needed transition to a new high school that partners with the youth agency to offer additional life supports.

There, she was able to overcome the challenges present at her previous school. She also developed leadership skills that she quickly put to the test by assembling and leading a dance team at her new school. “Her grades dramatically improved this year from C-D level grades at Wells School to getting As and Bs here [during] senior year,” said Will Chatman, program manager of YMEN. 

Most importantly, her newfound success enabled her to graduate in June. Now, she’s headed off to City Colleges of Chicago to continue her education. “In grades, school attendance, and school leadership, Jessica was a fantastic example of the impact created with the additional support and engagement through the United Way, Exelon, ComEd and YMEN collaboration,” YMEN leaders shared.

With a new school year underway, a new cohort of students will soon follow in Jessica’s footsteps. Though their path is their own to forge, the mentorship provided through the Stay In School Initiative will equip the students with the skills and confidence needed to thrive, and that will make all the difference.

The Young Leaders Society Commitment to Education

In2Books Blog_Erin

This year, United Way’s Young Leaders Society (YLS) has made on-going volunteerism their top priority. As a result, YLS has partnered with the In2Books program and a United Way partner agency AUSL to make a measurable impact this academic year. In2Books is a digital pen pal volunteer opportunity where each volunteer reads 5 books throughout an academic year with their pen pal and exchange discussion letters through a secure online inbox. Each book represents a different genre and is directly integrated into the class curriculum. YLS has brought this program into two Chicago Public Schools; one is National Teachers Elementary Academy where we have matched fifty-seven YLS volunteers in two fifth-grade classrooms. This particular school is on the Near South Side and serves a population that is over 83% low income. In total, YLS has mobilized 114 volunteers across Chicagoland to mentor 114 students in Chicago Public Schools.

My ePal, Arreon, wants to take after his grandma and work in a hospital someday or become an NBA star. Like any kid, he enjoys watching t.v. and playing games with his family. The first book all YLS volunteers read with their students is from the fiction genre. My student has chosen to read Donuthead by Sue Stauffacher. Donuthead is about a 5th-grade boy who struggles with everyday life for a number of reasons. For starters, his last name, Donuthead, makes him a target for bullies. He also suffers from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and finds it very hard to make friends. This is a very real scenario for many students no matter their income. I am so glad I can help my student talk about bullying in our letters.

Studies have shown that the students who participate in the In2Books program perform higher on standardized tests than students who do no not participate in the program. YLS is doing their part to contribute to the LIVE UNITED 2020 community-impact plan through awareness, volunteerism, and fundraising. You can help us realize this vision by becoming a member, lending a hand to volunteer, or attending our annual Festivus event.

Submitted on behalf of Erin Kilburg, YLS Community Outreach Vice Chair