Y.O.U. Summer Programs Expand Evanston Kids’ Horizons  

Huddled over a lush garden bed on a humid July afternoon, Emma Mosco-Flint dusted off a bunch of disfigured carrots before moving on to a bed of tall, ripe chives.

While her peers washed squash and chard in a patio sink, the 15-year-old hip-hop dancer and soon-to-be sophomore harvested the urban vegetable garden behind Youth & Opportunity United’s headquarters west of downtown Evanston. A participant of their Food, Farming and Future program, or F3, Emma values the opportunity to learn how to manage a garden and share the organic produce with her community.  

“I really like learning what’s in my food. As a dancer, I care about what I’m putting in my body and where it’s coming from,” Emma said.

Youth & Opportunity United (Y.O.U.), an Evanston youth development agency that offers year-round social and emotional learning programs to 1,600 young people and their families, hosts a

Jeremiah Dixon and Amir Woodfork wash bowls while making Elote at Y.O.U’s in-house kitchen.

range of additional summer programs intended to expand local students’ horizons and prepare them for post-secondary and lifelong success.

“That’s really the point of our programming – to really expand your vision of what you can be,” Maggie Blinn DiNovi, CEO of Y.O.U., said about the impact the organization strives to make on Evanston students, especially those enrolled at Evanston Township High School (ETHS).

Y.O.U.’s mission reflects the work of the Evanston Neighborhood Network, a coalition of community partners who have joined forces with United Way of Metro Chicago to improve racial and ethnic parity for African American and Latinx students. Broadly, Y.O.U. and other Network partners aim to prepare all young adults to lead happy, healthy, productive and satisfying lives.

“It’s a well-resourced school, but there’s an achievement gap. We’re addressing the opportunity gap between high-income and low-income students,” said Maggie, of ETHS. “It’s not about competing with [the school]. It’s about what else do students need? This is a place that kids are comfortable, and they’ve developed relationships that help them really realize their fullest potential.”

Kevin Hona listens to music with his peers Dez Foreman and Soleil Anderson in Y.O.U’s “maker space” studio.

While they offer a plethora of services and programming for students of all ages, Y.O.U. held five programs geared toward high-school aged youth this year. Another program, PEER, is designed to ease incoming freshman into their tenure at ETHS, located across the street. Throughout the 8-week program, Y.O.U. leaders take the students on informative tours of their new school, partner them with older mentors and facilitate career explorations, like inviting professionals to speak about their industries and careers. They also host culinary lessons with an in-house chef and provide seminars on healthy relationships.

Kevin Hona, 15, jumped on the opportunity to serve as a peer mentor for students enrolled in the program. When he isn’t teaching others the ropes, he utilizes the Y.O.U.’s new “maker space” to write poetry and make music. The incoming sophomore raves about the new styles of music he’s been pursuing since gaining access to the creative space, which houses computers with audio workstations, a 3D printer, iPads and, soon, a recording booth.

AnneGrace Bambi and Kaitlyn Henry work on projects in Y.O.U.’s “maker space” studio.

“It’s where I got introduced to a whole new different style of poetry,” Kevin said. “I’ve always love poetry, but this space brought that out. I was kind of shy about it honestly. This is what we call a safe space where I can do how I feel and it’s very fun exploring new things in a new environment.”

Like Kevin, Y.O.U. has helped AnneGrace Bambi, 14, explore new avenues, too. Her mentors at Y.O.U., including Em Roth, Y.O.U.’s director of high school OST programs, and Janelle Norman, manager of post-secondary success, have helped her discover her future career path. She dreams of attending Ohio State University to become an OBGYN.

In addition to guidance, AnneGrace appreciates the comfort and friendships she’s found at Y.O.U.

“Everyone knows each other, and we try to encourage one another,” she said. “I like the community we’ve built here.”

 

 

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